Cybersecurity

Grant seeks to counter attacks on power grid

Placeholder Image for Article Template

The Energy Department gave Georgia Institute of Technology researchers $5 million to develop protocols and tools that can detect cyberattacks on the nation's utility companies.

According to the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), the grant will fuel a cooperative effort to detect "adversarial manipulation of the power grid." The initiative seeks to provide real-time protection for the energy infrastructure by using advanced modeling and simulation technologies linked to a network of sensors.

Protecting the nation's utility infrastructure has been a thorny issue. Most power companies and their infrastructure are privately owned, and despite the increasing threat of cyberattacks, private-sector entities have generally preferred voluntary guidelines rather than mandates from the federal government.

Furthermore, the risk of cyberattacks on those facilities' infrastructure is growing at the same time the cybersecurity threat is increasing for federal computer networks.

The government plays a direct role in protecting its own networks, but it has been moving to increase public/private partnerships and spur R&D spending on cybersecurity protections for utilities. In February 2013, President Barack Obama released a cybersecurity executive order that called for more collaboration between government and the private sector on technological protection for utilities. DOE has been central to the effort.

To develop cybersecurity protections under DOE's recent grant, GTRI researchers will work with Georgia Tech's National Electric Energy Testing, Research and Applications Center and the Strategic Energy Institute, as well as its own Cyber Technology and Information Systems Laboratory.

The project will consist of three phases at Georgia Tech -- research and development, test, and evaluation -- followed by a technology demonstration at various sites with the help of multiple utility companies.

As part of the development process, GTRI said researchers will simulate numerous types of cyberattacks and develop a real-time decision-making algorithm that can evaluate the impact of potential infrastructure malfunctions.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a staff writer at FCW.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • computer network

    How Einstein changes the way government does business

    The Department of Commerce is revising its confidentiality agreement for statistical data survey respondents to reflect the fact that the Department of Homeland Security could see some of that data if it is captured by the Einstein system.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Army photo by Monica King. Jan. 26, 2017.

    Mattis mulls consolidation in IT, cyber

    In a Feb. 17 memo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told senior leadership to establish teams to look for duplication across the armed services in business operations, including in IT and cybersecurity.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DHS vague on rules for election aid, say states

    State election officials had more questions than answers after a Department of Homeland Security presentation on the designation of election systems as critical U.S. infrastructure.

  • Org Chart Stock Art - Shutterstock

    How the hiring freeze targets millennials

    The government desperately needs younger talent to replace an aging workforce, and experts say that a freeze on hiring doesn't help.

  • Shutterstock image: healthcare digital interface.

    VA moves ahead with homegrown scheduling IT

    The Department of Veterans Affairs will test an internally developed scheduling module at primary care sites nationwide to see if it's ready to service the entire agency.

  • Shutterstock images (honglouwawa & 0beron): Bitcoin image overlay replaced with a dollar sign on a hardware circuit.

    MGT Act poised for a comeback

    After missing in the last Congress, drafters of a bill to encourage cloud adoption are looking for a new plan.

Reader comments

Wed, Jan 22, 2014

I remember learning in engineering school that our power grid is old technology. Yet, I do not see this being investigated.

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group