Digital Conflict

By Kevin Coleman

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Kevin Coleman

Proposed Internet regulation would not include some nations

The World Conference on International Telecommunications that will take place December 3-14, 2012, will meet and consider updating the only existing global treaty on telecommunications.  

This treaty was established to facilitate the international interconnection and interoperability of information and communication services. The Telecommunication Development Bureau and entity under the  International Telecommunications Union created a report titled "Trends in Telecommunication Reform 2012; Smart Regulation for a Broadband World." The summary report is well worth reading.

Also said to be on the agenda is an Internet monitoring proposal (some call it content control) that is thought to be backed by a few countries. The News Limited Network in Australia reported: "A recently formulated document that was developed in obscurity was posted on the ITU website." It appears that this document was created in response to the growing number of threats countries face in cyberspace. It is believed that if adopted the proposal would allow government restriction on or blocking of information posted on the Internet. In addition, it would establish a global Internet communications monitoring entity.

This has spurred a very hot discussion about those who wish to exert control over content on the Internet. As I am sure you are aware, this has been an issue for some time now.  There are numerous interpretations of the posted document, and they vary greatly. One statement refers to a call for the 193 United Nations member countries to increase their regulatory control over the Internet and address the threats to cybersecurity. According the CIA Factbook there are there are 231 countries now connected to the Internet. So what about the 38 countries not part of the United Nations?

Posted by Defense Systems Staff on Dec 06, 2012 at 9:03 AM


Reader Comments

Thu, Dec 13, 2012 Kevin Coleman USA

Well they did it! The ITU meeting's chairman declared consensus on a proposal for a more "active" government role in Internet dealings. There was no formal vote, but Mohammed Nasser al-Ghanim said he based his decision on "the temperature of the room" following marathon negotiations. abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/group-nod-greater-internet-oversight-17942914#.UMp9XXfN8fQ

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