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VA Acquisition Academy chancellor wins national award

Chief Learning Officer magazine honored Lisa Doyle of the Veterans Affairs Department as the 2011 Chief Learning Officer of the Year.

Doyle is chancellor of the VA’s Acquisition Academy. She was named the academy’s first chancellor when it was formed in 2008 with a mandate to train, certify and expand the VA’s 40,000-member acquisition workforce.

Doyle received the award for her work in standing up the VA Acquisition Academy. As chancellor, she’s responsible for training VA’s acquisition workforce. She has established career development programs and is developing experiential learning opportunities.

Although the academy incorporates classroom work, Doyle takes a more holistic approach. The coursework goes well beyond rote learning of the Federal Acquisition Regulation to cover the softer skills needed by contracting officers.

“We take it to the next level,” Doyle said in a recent interview with Federal Computer Week. “Technical training is not everything. We develop the whole person.”

“The CLO of the Year award is given annually to the candidate who best exemplifies leadership qualities, creates the vision for change in his or her organization, and adds value for stakeholders,” the magazine said in a news release on Oct. 26.

Doyle was selected for the award by a panel of seven judges, including past recipients of the honor.



Posted by Alice Lipowicz, Matthew Weigelt on Oct 26, 2011 at 12:56 PM1 comments


Luigart takes top ELC honors

Craig Luigart, CIO for the Veterans Health Administration, earned the Janice K. Mendenhall Spirit of Leadership Award for his significant contributions to the federal information technology community at the Executive Leadership Conference, held in Williamsburg, Va., by the American Council for Technology and Industry Advisory Council.

Department of Veteran Affairs CIO Roger Baker presented  the award to Luigart, citing Luigart's pioneering efforts in improving government through the adoption of IT, his mentoring capabilities, and his leadership in strengthening government and industry collaboration as reasons for his win.

Luigart was just one of seven people honored at the conference awards banquet. Other winners included:

The ACT President's Award to Martha Przysucha, associate director at the General Services Administration's Office of Governmentwide Policy, for her demonstrated commitment to encourage public-private collaboration and cooperation.

The IAC Chair's Award to Jim Obendorfer of IBM and Anne Armstrong, President of 1105 Government Information Group for their significant contributions to ACT-IAC over the years.

Government Contributor of the Year to Rick Holgate, CIO for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, for his leadership in dealing with issues around emerging technologies.

Industry Contributor of the Year to Anne Reed, CEO of ASI Government and Chair of IAC's Financial Management Working Group.

ACT-IAC's Rookie of the Year to Michael Donovan of HP.

Posted on Oct 25, 2011 at 12:56 PM0 comments


Doing what with how much?

In launching the 2011 Executive Leadership Conference, Jim Beaupre's slip of the tongue expressed what most people wish were reality. In speaking about the downturn in business of the past few years, Beaupre -- chairman of the Industry Advisory Council's executive committee -- said: "We're way past doing less with more."

"Doing more with less," Mary Davie quickly corrected him. Davie, president of the American Council of Technology, sharing the stage with Beaupre. ELC, held in Williamsburg, Va., is an ACT/IAC conference.

Beaupre recovered his composure and continued: "We can hunker down, stick our heads in the sand and hope for the best. On the other hand, we can be part of the solution."

Davie them asked the audience to contribute ideas for improving the business climate. After listing Twitter as one way to communicate with ACT/IAC, she added, "If you don't use Twitter -- or if you need more than 140 characters because you have such a fabulous idea -- you can e-mail."

Posted by Michael Hardy on Oct 23, 2011 at 12:56 PM0 comments


Don't encourage Charlie Sheen

Scott Klososky, author, entrepreneur and advisory board member for Critical Technologies, kept the audience at American Council for Technology-Industry Advisory Council's Executive Leadership Conference in Williamsburg, Va., entertained with an hour-long evening keynote on the untapped potential of technology tools.

Early on, he noted that disgraced actor Charlie Sheen has attracted a sizeable Twitter following for his unfiltered musings. Klososky asked the audience if they followed Sheen. Only a few hands went up, but that was enough. "Stop it," Klososky commanded. "You're just encouraging him at this point."

Later, Klososky pointed out that young people are young people regardless of the technologies available to them. A 10-year-old boy is going to waste little time with a connected device before he's searching for terms like "kissing" or "naked." After waiting a moment for the audience reaction to fade, he said, "Don't act like you weren't a 10-year-old boy!"

"But I wasn't!" came a female voice in response.

Posted by Michael Hardy on Oct 23, 2011 at 12:56 PM0 comments


ISC2 honors federal IT security professionals for creating innovative apps

Everyone wants better federal cybersecurity, and the ISC2s group of information security professionals is honoring individuals and teams that are making it happen.

Winners of the U.S. Government Information Security Leadership Awards for 2011 announced on Oct. 19 were:

For technology improvement by an individual, the ISC2 honored Emma Garrison-Alexander, assistant administrator for IT at the Transportation Security Agency, led development of the TSA's Redaction Toolbar that helps to prevent release of sensitive security information.

The team award for tech improvement went to the information assurance program management team at the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, led by Austin Pearson and supported by Mary Johnson. The team designed an architecture to host an automated classified spillage solution.

For workforce improvement, the ISC2 honored the Cyberspace 200/300 Professional Continuing Education Team at the Air Force Cyber Technical Center of Excellence, led by Harold Arata III. The team developed senior rating courses for a cyber career force.

Davin Knolton, chief information officer of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, won the individual award for process and policy improvement. The team award went to the Air Force’s Military Satellite Communications Systems Directorate’s information assurance manager team, led by Steven Martin.

For community awareness, the ISC2 honored Henry Yu, chief information security officer of NASA, for outstanding contributions to an IT security video project.

The team awarded for best community awareness was the cybersecurity communications working group at the Homeland Security Department, led by communications manager Joel Benge.

Shawn Wilson, senior manager of information security for Verisign, Inc., won the federal contractor award for his efforts to executive certification and accreditation at the General Services Administration’s .gov registry.

The team contractor award went to NJVC LLC’s cyber dashboard team, led by Chris Hughes, for creating a dashboard application that helped to foil several hacker attempts against Defense Department systems.

Posted by Alice Lipowicz on Oct 19, 2011 at 12:56 PM0 comments


TSA reads the tabloids

At the Transportation Security Administration, Blogger Bob has been reading the tabloids. In a recent blog post, he referred to two articles and used them to clear up misconceptions about TSA.

The first article Bob used, from TMZ, told of how Kim Kardashian’s husband Kris Humphries dropped his wedding ring after taking it off to walk through a TSA metal detector.

“This near disaster could have been averted,” Bob writes. “Passengers do not have to remove jewelry. Our officers can advise you as to what might be making you alarm the detector, but it’s up to you whether or not you remove your rings, watches, necklaces, etc.”

The second story, from the U.K. Daily Mail, implied that a TSA scanner could tell whether Jessica Simpson is really pregnant. In fact, Bob explained, none of the scanning technologies TSA uses is strong enough to see through a body.

Posted on Oct 13, 2011 at 12:56 PM1 comments


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